Available courses

Application of communication theory and practice to the public speaking context, with emphasis on audience analysis, speaker delivery, ethics of communication, cultural diversity, and speech organizational techniques to develop students’ speaking abilities, as well as ability to effectively evaluate oral presentations.

The Adjunct Moodle Page is designed to provide training modules (video or PowerPoint) for the college's adjunct instructors.

This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals, concepts, strategies, applications, and contemporary trends related to understanding personal and/or community health issues. This course also focuses on empowering various populations with the ability to practice healthy living, promote healthy lifestyles, and ehance individual well-being.

Activity in beginning and advanced golf; beginning and advanced weight training; beginning and advanced racquetball; recreational racquetball; recreational volleyball; yoga; body conditioning; aikido; horsemanship; and rodeo production and management.

The purpose of this course is to provide students with an introduction to human movement that includes the historical development of physical education, exercise science, and sport. This course offers the student both an introduction to the knowledge base, as well as information on expanding career opportunities.

This course is designed to provide students with the resources needed to be successful at Western Texas College and subsequent learning environments.Students will be presented with a wide array of information regarding campus services and academic skill sets that are necessary for college success.Statistics suggest that students who participate in such college programs are much more likely to remain in college and complete their course of study.

This course provides an introduction to the fundamentals, concepts, strategies, applications, and contemporary trends related to understanding personal and/or community health issues. This course also focuses on empowering various populations with the ability to practice healthy living, promote healthy lifestyles, and enhance individual well-being.

Theory and applications for technical reports and correspondence in business.

An introduction to financial accounting concepts including the accounting cycle and financial statements for service and merchandising sole proprietorships or partnerships. The analysis, interpretation, and recording of business transactions, as well as special journals, the voucher system, and a general knowledge of basic accounting principles and procedures.

Topics include corporations, cost accounting, stocks, bonds, financial statement interpretations, and theories and principles of accounting, with an emphasis on management accounting methods.

This course provides a survey of economic systems, forms of business ownership, and considerations for running a business. Students will learn various aspects of business, management, and leadership functions; organizational considerations; and decision-making processes. Financial topics are introduced, including accounting, money and banking, and securities markets. Also included are discussions of business challenges in the legal and regulatory environment, business ethics, social responsibility, and international business. Emphasized is the dynamic role of business in everyday life.

The course provides the student with foundational information about the U.S. legal system and dispute resolution, and their impact on business. The major content areas will include general principles of law, the relationship of business and the U.S. Constitution, state and federal legal systems, the relationship between law and ethics, contracts, sales, torts, agency law, intellectual property, and business law in the global context.

Factors impacting the well-being of young children. Includes healthy behavior, food, nutrition, fitness, and safety practices. Focuses on local and national standards and legal implications of relevant policies and regulations. Requires students to participate in a minimum of 16 hours field experience with children from infancy through age 12 in a variety of settings with varied and diverse populations.

Factors impacting the well-being of young children. Includes healthy behavior, food, nutrition, fitness, and safety practices. Focuses on local and national standards and legal implications of relevant policies and regulations. Requires students to participate in a minimum of 16 hours field experience with children from infancy through age 12 in a variety of settings with varied and diverse populations.

An exploration of guidance strategies for promoting pro-social behaviors in children. Emphasis on positive guidance principles and techniques, family involvement, and cultural influences. Practical application through direct participation with children.


An exploration of guidance strategies for promoting pro-social behaviors in children. Emphasis on positive guidance principles and techniques, family involvement, and cultural influences. Practical application through direct participation with children.


A study of observation skills, assessment techniques, and documentation of children's development.

An exploration of principles, methods, and materials for teaching children music, movement, visual arts, and dramatic play through process-oriented experiences to support divergent thinking.

Physical, emotional, social, and cognitive factors impacting growth and development of children through adolescence.


Physical, emotional, social, and cognitive factors impacting growth and development of children through adolescence.


Basic information security goals of availability, integrity, accuracy, and confidentiality. Vocabulary and terminology specific to the field of information security are discussed. Indentification of exposures and vulnerabilities, and countermeasures; discuss the importance of planning and administrative controls; identify elements of information security risk management; and identify best practices and appropriate defenses, including firewalls, encryption, physical security, intrusion detection, and biometrics.

This course is designed to equip the learner with fundamental oral and written language skills regarding terminology used in the medical and associated health professions.

This course is designed to equip the learner with fundamental oral and written language skills regarding terminology used in the medical and associated health professions.

Skill development coding to prepare reimbursement forms in various health care settings for submission to payers.

Presentation and application of basic coding rules, principles, guidelines, and conventions utilizing various coding systems.

A work-based learning experience that enables the student to apply specialized occupational theory, skills, and concepts. A learning plan is developed by the college and the employer.

A work-based learning experience that enables the student to apply specialized occupational theory, skills, and concepts. A learning plan is developed by the college and the employer.

A work-based learning experience that enables the student to apply specialized occupational theory, skills, and concepts. A learning plan is developed by the college and the employer.

Continued study of the instruments and control systems used in the process industries including terminology, process variables, symbology, control loops, and troubleshooting.

Instruction in the different types of troubleshooting techniques, procedures, and methods used to solve process problems.

Analysis of the behavior of individual economic agents, including consumer behavior and demand, producer behavior and supply, price and output decisions by firms under various market structures, factor markets, market failures, and international trade

An analysis of the economy as a whole including measurement and determination of Aggregate Demand and Aggregate Supply, national income, inflation, and unemployment. Other topics include international trade, economic growth, business cycles, and fiscal policy and monetary policy. 


An analysis of the economy as a whole including measurement and determination of Aggregate Demand and Aggregate Supply, national income, inflation, and unemployment. Other topics include international trade, economic growth, business cycles, and fiscal policy and monetary policy. 


Analysis of the behavior of individual economic agents, including consumer behavior and demand, producer behavior and supply, price and output decisions by firms under various market structures, factor markets, market failures, and international trade

Introductory course in principles and policies of economics as applied to money and banking, taxes, government debt, national income, gross national products, labor-management relations, social security, international economics, and economic changes in the modern world.

This course is designed to provide students with the resources needed to be successful at Western Texas College and subsequent learning environments.Students will be presented with a wide array of information regarding campus services and academic skill sets that are necessary for college success.Statistics suggest that students who participate in such college programs are much more likely to remain in college and complete their course of study.

This course is designed to provide students with the resources needed to be successful at Western Texas College and subsequent learning environments.Students will be presented with a wide array of information regarding campus services and academic skill sets that are necessary for college success.Statistics suggest that students who participate in such college programs are much more likely to remain in college and complete their course of study.

This course is designed to provide students with the resources needed to be successful at Western Texas College and subsequent learning environments.Students will be presented with a wide array of information regarding campus services and academic skill sets that are necessary for college success.Statistics suggest that students who participate in such college programs are much more likely to remain in college and complete their course of study.

This course is designed to provide students with the resources needed to be successful at Western Texas College and subsequent learning environments.Students will be presented with a wide array of information regarding campus services and academic skill sets that are necessary for college success.Statistics suggest that students who participate in such college programs are much more likely to remain in college and complete their course of study.

This course is designed to provide students with the resources needed to be successful at Western Texas College and subsequent learning environments.Students will be presented with a wide array of information regarding campus services and academic skill sets that are necessary for college success.Statistics suggest that students who participate in such college programs are much more likely to remain in college and complete their course of study.

Provides a basic understanding of wind kinematics, aerodynamic laws, fluid dynamics, and thermal dynamics and their applications to wind energy generation.

Provides hands-on experience using MathLab to apply math skills associated with mathematical modeling and data manipulation to wind data. Corequisite:  WIND 1310

Introduction to the fundamentals of wind mathematical modeling (one to three dimensions). Corequisite:  WIND 1110.

Provides hands-on experience using MathLab to apply math skills associated with mathematical modeling and data manipulation to wind data. Corequisite:  WIND 1310

Introduction to the fundamentals of wind mathematical modeling (one to three dimensions). Corequisite:  WIND 1110.

Provides a basic understanding of the wind energy industry, turbine architecture, applications of meteorology, wind farm development, law and policy, and other renewable sources.

A continuation of ENGL 1301. Analysis of prose narrative, poetry, drama, and film. Practice in expository and critical writing, and research methods. Prerequisite: successful completion of ENGL 1031 or equivalent or permission of department head. (Rdg. Wtg.)

Oral and written composition principles. Emphasis on language study and mechanics of writing, with the short composition and writing of investigative papers stressed. (Rd, Wtg)

ENGL 2311 emphasizes principles, techniques, and skills needed for college level scientific, technical, or business writing. Students are introduced to the major document categories (letters, e-mails, memos, instructions, proposals, and reports) they will be expected to write in the workplace. Prerequisite: successful completion of ENGL 1301 or equivalent. This class is reading and writing intensive.

A survey of the development of British literature from the Anglo-Saxon period to the Eighteenth century. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical, linguistic, and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from a diverse group of authors and traditions.

American Literature treats American writers and their writings in context to better understand their intellectual and cultural value and challenges.

The WTC English Lab is the resource home for all grammar and punctuation exercises used in conjunction with ENGL 1301 (Composition I) and ENGL 1302 (Composition II). This includes WYSIWYGs using audio instruction and fillable form PDFs, Prescription assignments using fillable form PDFs, and e-learning Prescriptions using SCORM-based online assessments.

Intensive study of and practice in the strategies and techniques for developing research-based expository and persuasive texts.Emphasis on effective and ethical rhetorical inquiry, including primary and secondary research methods; critical reading of verbal, visual, and multimedia texts; systematic evaluation, synthesis, and documentation of information sources; and critical thinking about evidence and conclusions.

A survey of American literature from the period of exploration and settlement to the present. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from a diverse group of authors, for what they reflect and reveal about the evolving American experience and character.

Intensive study of and practice in writing processes, from invention and researching to drafting, revising, and editing, both individually and collaboratively. Emphasis on effective rhetorical choices, including audience, purpose, arrangement, and style. Focus on writing the academic essay as a vehicle for learning, communicating, and critical analysis.

ENGL 1301 is designed to provide instruction in both writing and critical thinking skills. The course outcome projects an improved understanding of grammar and punctuation, sentence structure, paragraph organization, and essay organization. Critical thinking is encouraged throughout as students paraphrase, summarize, analyze, and synthesize information.

Course covers representative American writers and their writings to the present. Studies are both narrative and expository prose, along with drama and poetry.

ENGL 1302 (Composition II) is designed to provide instruction in writing, research, and critical thinking skills. Elements of literature -- e.g. plot, characterization, theme, symbolism -- are use as topics for both in-class discussion and out-of-class writing. Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENGL 1301 with a grade of C or higher.

ENGL 1301 is designed to provide instruction in both writing and critical thinking skills. The course outcome projects an improved understanding of grammar and punctuation, sentence structure, paragraph organization, and essay organization. Critical thinking is encouraged throughout as students paraphrase, summarize, analyze, and synthesize information.

ENGL 1302 (Composition II) is designed to provide instruction in writing, research, and critical thinking skills. Elements of literature -- e.g. plot, characterization, theme, symbolism -- are use as topics for both in-class discussion and out-of-class writing. Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENGL 1301 with a grade of C or higher.

A general survey of the major works in English literature from Anglo-Saxon times to the present. Prerequisites: Successful completion of ENGL1302 or equivalent.

ENGL 2341. Forms of Literature.
Survey of Dramatic Literature.
This class surveys the development of western civilization's dramatic literature from the ancient Greeks to contemporary American theatre. Students will analyze dramatic works in relation to their historical, linguistic, and cultural contexts.

Welcome to Art Appreciation! This class will introduce you to a variety of two and three-dimensional art techniques, to a plethora of artists, and to many ideas about the motivations and social implications of art. Art is HUGE and fun to explore; here you'll read about it, write about it, and even create a few pieces in order to discover just how important Art really is.

Ray Newton's Dram 1310 Theatre Appreciation studies the development of western theatre. This class is an overview of Western Civilization's theatre practices from the Ancient Greeks to contemporary American theatre. We read, watch, and interact with representative plays and theatre practices.[NO ACTING - This is a lecture class.]

A study of the cinematic art form. Emphasis on the analysis of the visual and aural aspects of selected motion pictures, dramatic aspects of narrative films, and historical growth and sociological effect of film as an art.

A general survey of music literature designed for the non-music major. Information and techniques for the intelligent appreciation of music through readings and recorded music. Includes the study of cultural periods, major composers, and musical elements.

Application of communication theory and practice to the public speaking context, with emphasis on audience analysis, speaker delivery, ethics of communication, cultural diversity, and speech organizational techniques to develop students’ speaking abilities, as well as ability to effectively evaluate oral presentations.

Application of communication theory and practice to the public speaking context, with emphasis on audience analysis, speaker delivery, ethics of communication, cultural diversity, and speech organizational techniques to develop students’ speaking abilities, as well as ability to effectively evaluate oral presentations.

Application of communication theory and practice to the public speaking context, with emphasis on audience analysis, speaker delivery, ethics of communication, cultural diversity, and speech organizational techniques to develop students’ speaking abilities, as well as ability to effectively evaluate oral presentations.

Application of communication theory and practice to the public speaking context, with emphasis on audience analysis, speaker delivery, ethics of communication, cultural diversity, and speech organizational techniques to develop students’ speaking abilities, as well as ability to effectively evaluate oral presentations.

Application of communication theory and practice to the public speaking context, with emphasis on audience analysis, speaker delivery, ethics of communication, cultural diversity, and speech organizational techniques to develop students’ speaking abilities, as well as ability to effectively evaluate oral presentations.

Application of communication theory to interpersonal relationship development, maintenance, and termination in relationship contexts including friendships, romantic partners, families, and relationships with co-workers and supervisors.

Origin and development of the U.S. Constitution, structure and powers of the national government including the legislative, executive, and judicial branches, federalism, political participation, the national election process, public policy, civil liberties and civil rights.

Origin and development of the Texas constitution, structure and powers of state and local government, federalism and intergovernmental relations, political participation, the election process, public policy, and the political culture of Texas.

Origin and development of the Texas constitution, structure and powers of state and local government, federalism and intergovernmental relations, political participation, the election process, public policy, and the political culture of Texas.

Origin and development of the Texas constitution, structure and powers of state and local government, federalism and inter-governmental relations, political participation, the election process, public policy, and the political culture of Texas.

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, and intellectual history of the United Stated from the Civil Ware/Reconstruction era to the present. United States History II examines industrialization, immigration, world wars, the Great Depression, Cold War and post-Cold War eras. Themes that may be addressed in United States History II include:  American culture, religion, civil and human rights, technological change, economic change, immigration and migration, urbanization and suburbanization, the expansion of the federal government, and the study of U.S. foreign policy.

Study of the American nation from English colonization to the close of Reconstruction. Development of American characteristics and nationality from
the early European exploration to the end of Reconstruction in 1877.

Study of the American nation from 1877 to the present. Included are the emergence of the United States as a world power, World War I, the Twenties, the Great Depression, World War II, the Cold War, and the problems of modern America. Required of all students for graduation.

Continued development of basic Spanish language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing within a cultural framework. Students acquire the vocabulary and grammatical structures necessary to communicate and comprehend at the high beginner to low intermediate level.

Basic Spanish language skills in listening, speaking, reading, and writing within a cultural framework.  Students will acquire the vocabulary and grammatical structures necessary to communicate and comprehend at the beginner level.

This is a Calculus course which introduces limits, derivatives and basic integration.

This course is Business Calculus which applies limits, derivatives and basic integration to the Business World.

This course is Business Calculus which applies limits, derivatives and basic integration to the Business World.

This course is Business Calculus which applies limits, derivatives and basic integration to the Business World.

Topics for this course will include: transcendental functions, applications of integration including area, volume and work, techniques of integrations, infinite series, and lab applications. Prerequisite: successful completion of MATH2413 (rd, Mth)

Topics for this course include: linear, quadratic, and absolute value equations; linear and absolute value inequalities; complex numbers; graphing equations; writing equations of the line; polynomial, rational, exponentials, and logarithmic functions; systems of equations; properties and inverses of matrices.

Topics for this course will include: trigonometric functions; solutions of triangle; trigonometric identities and equations; and inverse trigonometric functions. Prerequisite: MATH 1314, or placement by college entrance exam score(s).

Topics for this course include: elementary functions; mathematics of finance; systems of linear equations; matrices; linear inequalities; linear programming; logic; sets and counting; and probability.

Elementary Statistics - techniques of analysis of numerical data are emphasized.

Topics for this course include: elementary functions; mathematics of finance; systems of linear equations; matrices; linear inequalities; linear programming; logic; sets and counting; and probability.

Topics for this course include: elementary functions; mathematics of finance; systems of linear equations; matrices; linear inequalities; linear programming; logic; sets and counting; and probability.

Topics for this course will include: transcendental functions, applications of integration including area, volume and work, techniques of integrations, infinite series, and lab applications. Prerequisite: successful completion of MATH2413 (rd, Mth)

Topics for this course will include: transcendental functions, applications of integration including area, volume and work, techniques of integrations, infinite series, and lab applications. Prerequisite: successful completion of MATH2413 (rd, Mth)

Topics for this course will include: trigonometric functions; solutions of triangle; trigonometric identities and equations; and inverse trigonometric functions. Prerequisite: MATH 1314, or placement by college entrance exam score(s).

This course is Business Calculus which applies limits, derivatives and basic integration to the Business World.

This is a Calculus course which introduces limits, derivatives and basic integration.

Topics for this course include: linear, quadratic, and absolute value equations; linear and absolute value inequalities; complex numbers; graphing equations; writing equations of the line; polynomial, rational, exponentials, and logarithmic functions; systems of equations; properties and inverses of matrices.

An introduction to mathematics and the solving of word problems to include sets; the real number system; elementary algebra including equations and inequalities in one variable, radicals; systems of equations and inequalities with graphing; simple geometry and geometric formulae using U.S. customary and metric measurements.

Topics for this course include: elementary functions; mathematics of finance; systems of linear equations; matrices; linear inequalities; linear programming; logic; sets and counting; and probability.

Topics for this course include: linear, quadratic, and absolute value equations; linear and absolute value inequalities; complex numbers; graphing equations; writing equations of the line; polynomial, rational, exponentials, and logarithmic functions; systems of equations; properties and inverses of matrices.

Topics may include, but are not limited to the real number system; linear equations and applications; linear inequalities and absolute value; graphs of linear equations and inequalities; functions; and system of linear equations.

Topics may include, but are not limited to the real number system; linear equations and applications; linear inequalities and absolute value; graphs of linear equations and inequalities; functions; and system of linear equations.

Topics for this course include: linear, quadratic, and absolute value equations; linear and absolute value inequalities; complex numbers; graphing equations; writing equations of the line; polynomial, rational, exponentials, and logarithmic functions; systems of equations; properties and inverses of matrices.

Topics for this course will include: trigonometric functions; solutions of triangle; trigonometric identities and equations; and inverse trigonometric functions. Prerequisite: MATH 1314, or placement by college entrance exam score(s).

Topics for this course include: elementary functions; mathematics of finance; systems of linear equations; matrices; linear inequalities; linear programming; logic; sets and counting; and probability.

This course is Business Calculus which applies limits, derivatives and basic integration to the Business World.

An introduction to mathematics and the solving of word problems to include sets; the real number system; elementary algebra including equations and inequalities in one variable, radicals; systems of equations and inequalities with graphing; simple geometry and geometric formulae using U.S. customary and metric measurements.

This course is designed for students requiring remediation in intermediate algebra skills. Topics for this course include exponents and polynomials; factoring; rational expressions and functions and roots and radicals.

Topics for this course include: elementary functions; mathematics of finance; systems of linear equations; matrices; linear inequalities; linear programming; logic; sets and counting; and probability.

This course was designed to help high school students become college ready in Mathematics.

This course was designed to help high school students become college ready in Mathematics.

This course was designed to help high school students become college ready in Mathematics.

This course was designed to help high school students become college ready in Mathematics.

NetTutor online tutoring service for WTC Students

Life-Span Growth and Development is a study of social, emotional, cognitive, and physical factors and influences of a developing human from conception to death.  Online Class.

This course explores select groups of current social problems with specific reference to their origin, development, and suggested solutions. This course further applies the principles of group behavior and organization to the analysis of problems in basic social institutions and consideration of possible solutions.

The scientific study of human society, including ways in which groups, social institutions, and individuals affect each other. Causes of social stability and social change are explored through the application of various theoretical perspectives, key concepts, and related methods of sociology. Analysis of social issues in their institutional context may include topics such as social stratification, gender, race-ethnicity, and deviance.

The scientific study of human society, including ways in which groups, social institutions, and individuals affect each other. Causes of social stability and social change are explored through the application of various theoretical perspectives, key concepts, and related methods of sociology. Analysis of social issues in their institutional context may include topics such as social stratification, gender, race-ethnicity, and deviance.

The scientific study of human society, including ways in which groups, social institutions, and individuals affect each other. Causes of social stability and social change are explored through the application of various theoretical perspectives, key concepts, and related methods of sociology. Analysis of social issues in their institutional context may include topics such as social stratification, gender, race-ethnicity, and deviance.

This course explores select groups of current social problems with specific reference to their origin, development, and suggested solutions. This course further applies the principles of group behavior and organization to the analysis of problems in basic social institutions and consideration of possible solutions.

The scientific study of human society, including ways in which groups, social institutions, and individuals affect each other. Causes of social stability and social change are explored through the application of various theoretical perspectives, key concepts, and related research methods of sociology. Analysis of social issues in their institutional context may include topics such as social stratification, gender, race-ethnicity, and deviance.

This course explores select groups of current social problems with specific reference to their origin, development, and suggested solutions. This course further applies the principles of group behavior and organization to the analysis of problems in basic social institutions and consideration of possible solutions.

Analysis of marriage and family relations in today's complex society. Areas of study include factors in a successful marriage, dating, engagement, legal control of marriage, sex differences and roles, interfamily dynamics and adjustments.

Study of the use and abuse of drugs in today's society. Emphasized the physiological, sociological, and psychological factors.

This course is for Roscoe/WTC students only.

The scientific study of human society, including ways in which groups, social institutions, and individuals affect each other. Causes of social stability and social change are explored through the application of various theoretical perspectives, key concepts, and related methods of sociology. Analysis of social issues in their institutional context may include topics such as social stratification, gender, race-ethnicity, and deviance.

Study of the structure and function of humananatomy, including the neuroendocrine,integumentary, musculoskeletal, digestive,urinary, reproductive, respiratory, andcirculatory systems. Content may be eitherintegrated or specialized.

Fundamental course designed as an introduction to concepts of essential nutrition with emphasis on individual nutrition related to health issues.

Fundamental principles of living organisms including physical and chemical properties of life, organization, function, evolutionary adaptation, and classification. Concepts of reproduction, genetics, ecology, and the scientific method are included.

Study of the structure and function of humananatomy, including the neuroendocrine,integumentary, musculoskeletal, digestive,urinary, reproductive, respiratory, andcirculatory systems. Content may be eitherintegrated or specialized.

Additional study of the physiology and biochemistry of the human and other vertebrates with special emphasis on homeostasis and disease. Includes a required lab.

This course will provide a survey of biological principles with an emphasis on humans, including evolution, ecology, plant and animal diversity, and physiology. Required laboratory.


Additional study of the physiology and biochemistry of the human and other vertebrates with special emphasis on homeostasis and disease. Includes a required lab.

Chemical equilibrium; phase diagrams and spectrometry; acid-base concepts, thermodynamics, kinetics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, an introduction to organic chemistry and descriptive inorganic chemistry. Required laboratory.

General principles, problems, fundamental laws, and theories.

A survey of the fundamental theories of chemistry and the properties of matter emphasized in inorganic chemistry. For pre-nursing and non-science majors. Lab work will include some qualitative analysis. Includes a required lab.

General principles, problems, fundamental laws, and theories.

Survey of oceanography and related sciences.


Direction of the magnetic force for a particle moving under the action of a magnetic field.


Principles of physics for science, computer science, and engineering majors, using calculus, involving the principles of electricity and magnetism, including circuits, electromagnetism, waves, light, and optics. 



Direction of the magnetic force for a particle moving under the action of a magnetic field.


Principles of physics for science, computer science, and engineering majors, using calculus, involving the principles of electricity and magnetism, including circuits, electromagnetism, waves, light, and optics. 



Direction of the magnetic force for a particle moving under the action of a magnetic field.


Principles of physics for science, computer science, and engineering majors, using calculus, involving the principles of electricity and magnetism, including circuits, electromagnetism, waves, light, and optics. 


Designed for engineering, physics and physical science, pre-medical and pre-dental students and students of architecture and education. Study of elements of mechanics, mechanics of fluids, properties of matter, and heat. Prerequisite: high school trigonometry and MATH1314 or concurrent enrollment therein. Includes a required laboratory.

Designed for engineering, physics and physical science, pre-medical and pre-dental students and students of architecture and education. Study of elements of mechanics, mechanics of fluids, properties of matter, and heat. Prerequisite: high school trigonometry and MATH1314 or concurrent enrollment therein. Includes a required laboratory.

Designed for pre-medical and pre-dental students and students of architecture and education. Study of elements of mechanics, mechanics of fluids, properties of matter, and heat. Prerequisite: high school trigonometry and MATH1314 or concurrent enrollment therein. Includes a required laboratory. (Rdg, Mth)

Continuation of PHYS1401. Study of fundamentals of electricity and magnetism, wave motion, sound and light. includes a required laboratory. Prerequisites: PHYS1401 (Rd, Mth)

Designed for pre-medical and pre-dental students and students of architecture and education. Study of elements of mechanics, mechanics of fluids, properties of matter, and heat. Prerequisite: high school trigonometry and MATH1314 or concurrent enrollment therein. Includes a required laboratory. (Rdg, Mth)

Designed for engineering, physics and physical science, pre-medical and pre-dental students and students of architecture and education. Study of elements of mechanics, mechanics of fluids, properties of matter, and heat. Prerequisite: high school trigonometry and MATH1314 or concurrent enrollment therein. Includes a required laboratory.

Continuation of PHYS1401. Study of fundamentals of electricity and magnetism, wave motion, sound and light. includes a required laboratory. Prerequisites: PHYS1401 (Rd, Mth)

Designed for engineering, physics and physical science, pre-medical and pre-dental students and students of architecture and education. Study of elements of mechanics, mechanics of fluids, properties of matter, and heat. Prerequisite: high school trigonometry and MATH1314 or concurrent enrollment therein. Includes a required laboratory.

Designed for engineering, physics and physical science, pre-medical and pre-dental students and students of architecture and education. Study of elements of mechanics, mechanics of fluids, properties of matter, and heat. Prerequisite: high school trigonometry and MATH1314 or concurrent enrollment therein. Includes a required laboratory.

Study of the structure and function of humananatomy, including the neuroendocrine,integumentary, musculoskeletal, digestive,urinary, reproductive, respiratory, andcirculatory systems. Content may be eitherintegrated or specialized.