Available courses

NetTutor online tutoring service for WTC Students

Prevention and care of athletic injuries with emphasis on qualities of a good athletic trainer, avoiding accidents and injuries, recognizing signs and symptoms of specific sports injuries and conditions, immediate and long-term care of injuries, and administration procedures in athletic training.

The course provides the student with foundational information about the U.S. legal system and dispute resolution, and their impact on business. The major content areas will include general principles of law, the relationship of business and the U.S. Constitution, state and federal legal systems, the relationship between law and ethics, contracts, sales, torts, agency law, intellectual property, and business law in the global context.

An introduction to financial accounting concepts including the accounting cycle and financial statements for service and merchandising sole proprietorships or partnerships. The analysis, interpretation, and recording of business transactions, as well as special journals, the voucher system, and a general knowledge of basic accounting principles and procedures.

Topics include corporations, cost accounting, stocks, bonds, financial statement interpretations, and theories and principles of accounting, with an emphasis on management accounting methods.

This course provides a survey of economic systems, forms of business ownership, and considerations for running a business. Students will learn various aspects of business, management, and leadership functions; organizational considerations; and decision-making processes. Financial topics are introduced, including accounting, money and banking, and securities markets. Also included are discussions of business challenges in the legal and regulatory environment, business ethics, social responsibility, and international business. Emphasized is the dynamic role of business in everyday life.

History, philosophy, and ethical considerations of criminal justice; the nature and impact of crime; and an overview of the criminal justice system, including law enforcement and court procedures.

Study of the judiciary in the American criminal justice system and the adjudication processes and procedures.

Study of the child, family, community, and schools. Includes parent education and involvement, family and community lifestyles, child abuse, and current family life issues. Course content is aligned with State Board for Educator Certification Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities standards. Requires students to participate in a minimum of 16 hours field experience with children from infancy through age 12 in a variety of settings with varied and diverse populations.

Study of the child, family, community, and schools. Includes parent education and involvement, family and community lifestyles, child abuse, and current family life issues. Course content is aligned with State Board for Educator Certification Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities standards. Requires students to participate in a minimum of 16 hours field experience with children from infancy through age 12 in a variety of settings with varied and diverse populations.

An introduction to the education of the young child. Includes developmentally appropriate practices and programs, theoretical and historical perspectives, ethical and professional responsibilities, and current issues. Course content is aligned with State Board for Educator Certification Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities standards. Requires students to participate in a minimum of 16 hours of field experience with children from infancy through age 12 in a variety of settings with varied and diverse populations.

An introduction to the education of the young child. Includes developmentally appropriate practices and programs, theoretical and historical perspectives, ethical and professional responsibilities, and current issues. Course content is aligned with State Board for Educator Certification Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities standards. Requires students to participate in a minimum of 16 hours of field experience with children from infancy through age 12 in a variety of settings with varied and diverse populations.

A study of the fundamentals of developmentally appropriate curriculum designs and implementation in early care and education programs for children birth through age eight.

A study of the fundamentals of developmentally appropriate curriculum designs and implementation in early care and education programs for children birth through age eight.

A study of appropriate infant and toddler programs (birth to age 3), including an overview of development, quality routines, appropriate environments, materials and activities, and teaching/guidance techniques.



An exploration of principles, methods, and materials for teaching young children language and literacy through a play-based integrated curriculum.


A survey of information regarding children with special needs, including possible causes and characteristics of exceptionalities, intervention strategies, available resources, referral processes, the advocacy role, and legislative issues.

A practical application of management procedures for early child care education programs, including a study of operating, supervising, and evaluating programs. Topics cover philosophy, types of programs, policies, fiscal management, regulations, staffing, evaluation, and communication.

Physical, emotional, social, and cognitive factors impacting growth and development of children through adolescence.


An exploration of guidance strategies for promoting pro-social behaviors in children. Emphasis on positive guidance principles and techniques, family involvement, and cultural influences. Practical application through direct participation with children.


Physical, emotional, social, and cognitive factors impacting growth and development of children through adolescence.


Overview of computer systems--hardware, operating systems, and microcomputer application software, including the Internet, word processing, spreadsheets, presentation graphics, and databases. Current issues such as the effect of computers on society, and the history and use of computers in business, educational, and other modern settings are also studied. This course is not intended to count toward a student's major field of study in business or computer science.

Customer support skills and real world applications for the operation of a call center, front desk, or help desk. Skills should include effective communication for internal and external customers, best practices, and problem solving skills including: in-person, telephone, email, or Internet.

Customer support skills and real world applications for the operation of a call center, front desk, or help desk. Skills should include effective communication for internal and external customers, best practices, and problem solving skills including: in-person, telephone, email, or Internet.

Customer support skills and real world applications for the operation of a call center, front desk, or help desk. Skills should include effective communication for internal and external customers, best practices, and problem solving skills including: in-person, telephone, email, or Internet.

Instruction in web design and related graphic design issues including mark-up languages, web sites, and browsers.

The role of mass communications and how it affects society is discussed. Different mass media are profiled including how each functions and affects a dynamic society.

The role of mass communications and how it affects society is discussed. Different mass media are profiled including how each functions and affects a dynamic society.

Introduction to systems and processes for collecting, maintaining, and disseminating primary and secondary health related information including content of health record, documentation requirements, registries, indices, licensing, regulatory agencies, forms, and screens.

This course is designed to equip the learner with fundamental oral and written language skills regarding terminology used in the medical and associated health professions.

Presentation and application of basic coding rules, principles, guidelines, and conventions utilizing various coding systems.

An introduction to the various aspects of the petroleum industry, including equipment, systems, instrumentation, operations, and the various scientific principles. Addresses a variety of petroleum technologies: exploration, drilling, production, transportation, marketing, and chemical processing industries.

Principles of corrosion as it applies to oil and gas industries. Addresses the deterioration of materials, devices, and pieces of oil field (or other) machinery/equipment. Emphasis on terminology associated with metallic and nonmetallic corrosion.

An overview for petroleum and manufacturing workers of state/federal regulation and guidelines which require industrial safety training. Topics include the 29 C.F.R. 1910, 1926 standards.

Practical aspects of artificial lift in production systems. Analyze the characteristics of a particular reservoir; select the type of artificial lift required; and design artificial lift systems.

Instruction in the basic principles of physics and their application to process facilities. Topics include physical laws and properties and how these relate to the operation of processes.

An introduction to programmable logic controllers as used in industrial environments including basic concepts, programming, applications, troubleshooting of ladder logic, and interfacing of equipment.

Practical methods of flow measurements and flow integration. Emphasized primary flow element selection and calculations in accordance with American Gas Association (AGA) and American Petroleum Institute (API) standards.

A study of the theory and operation of various types of pumps and compressors. Topics include mechanical power transmission systems including gears, v-belts, and chain drives.

An introductory overview of the process industries.

The study of the common types of industrial processes.

A study of the various process systems including related scientific principles.

Study of the identification, characteristics, cultural requirements, and landscape uses of native and adapted plants. Includes a focused study of the woody and herbaceous plant materials used in landscape and horticulture industries.


A combination lecture/laboratory skills-centered approach designed to refine reading and writing skills. Focus is on applying critical reading skills for organizing, analyzing, and retaining material and developing written wrodk appropriate to the audience, purpose, situation, and length of the assignment. The course integrates preparation in basic academic reading skills with basic skills in writing a variety of academic essays. This course includes a required lab.


A combination lecture/laboratory skills-centered approach designed to refine reading and writing skills. Focus is on applying critical reading skills for organizing, analyzing, and retaining material and developing written wrodk appropriate to the audience, purpose, situation, and length of the assignment. The course integrates preparation in basic academic reading skills with basic skills in writing a variety of academic essays. This course includes a required lab.


A combination lecture/laboratory skills-centered approach designed to refine reading and writing skills. Focus is on applying critical reading skills for organizing, analyzing, and retaining material and developing written wrodk appropriate to the audience, purpose, situation, and length of the assignment. The course integrates preparation in basic academic reading skills with basic skills in writing a variety of academic essays. This course includes a required lab.

An analysis of the economy as a whole including measurement and determination of Aggregate Demand and Aggregate Supply, national income, inflation, and unemployment. Other topics include international trade, economic growth, business cycles, and fiscal policy and monetary policy. 


Analysis of the behavior of individual economic agents, including consumer behavior and demand, producer behavior and supply, price and output decisions by firms under various market structures, factor markets, market failures, and international trade

An analysis of the economy as a whole including measurement and determination of Aggregate Demand and Aggregate Supply, national income, inflation, and unemployment. Other topics include international trade, economic growth, business cycles, and fiscal policy and monetary policy. 


Analysis of the behavior of individual economic agents, including consumer behavior and demand, producer behavior and supply, price and output decisions by firms under various market structures, factor markets, market failures, and international trade

An enriched, integrated pre-service course and content experience that:

  1. provides active recruitment and institutional support of students interested in a teaching career, especially in high need fields;
  2. provides students with opportunities to participate in early field observations at all levels of P-12 schools with varied and diverse student populations;
  3. provides students with support from college and school faculty, preferably in small cohort groups, for the purpose of introduction to and analysis of the culture of schooling and classrooms ;
  4. course content should be aligned as applicable with State Board for Educator Certification Pedagogy and Professional Responsibilities standards; and
  5. course must include a minimum of 16 contact hours of field experience in P-12 classrooms.

This course is designed to provide students with the resources needed to be successful at Western Texas College and subsequent learning environments.Students will be presented with a wide array of information regarding campus services and academic skill sets that are necessary for college success.Statistics suggest that students who participate in such college programs are much more likely to remain in college and complete their course of study.

This course is designed to provide students with the resources needed to be successful at Western Texas College and subsequent learning environments.Students will be presented with a wide array of information regarding campus services and academic skill sets that are necessary for college success.Statistics suggest that students who participate in such college programs are much more likely to remain in college and complete their course of study.

This course is designed to provide students with the resources needed to be successful at Western Texas College and subsequent learning environments.Students will be presented with a wide array of information regarding campus services and academic skill sets that are necessary for college success.Statistics suggest that students who participate in such college programs are much more likely to remain in college and complete their course of study.

This course is designed to provide students with the resources needed to be successful at Western Texas College and subsequent learning environments.Students will be presented with a wide array of information regarding campus services and academic skill sets that are necessary for college success.Statistics suggest that students who participate in such college programs are much more likely to remain in college and complete their course of study.

This course is designed to provide students with the resources needed to be successful at Western Texas College and subsequent learning environments.Students will be presented with a wide array of information regarding campus services and academic skill sets that are necessary for college success.Statistics suggest that students who participate in such college programs are much more likely to remain in college and complete their course of study.

This course is designed to provide students with the resources needed to be successful at Western Texas College and subsequent learning environments.Students will be presented with a wide array of information regarding campus services and academic skill sets that are necessary for college success.Statistics suggest that students who participate in such college programs are much more likely to remain in college and complete their course of study.

Provides a basic understanding of the wind energy industry, turbine architecture, applications of meteorology, wind farm development, law and policy, and other renewable sources.

Oral and written composition principles. Emphasis on language study and mechanics of writing, with the short composition and writing of investigative papers stressed.

American Literature treats American writers and their writings in context to better understand their intellectual and cultural value and challenges.

ENGL 1301 - Composition I places an emphasis on language study and mechanics of writing, with the short composition and writing of investigative papers stressed.

Oral and written composition principles. Emphasis on language study and mechanics of writing, with the short composition and writing of investigative papers stressed.

ENGL 2311 emphasizes principles, techniques, and skills needed for college level scientific, technical, or business writing. Students are introduced to the major document categories (letters, e-mails, memos, instructions, proposals, and reports) they will be expected to write in the workplace. Prerequisite: successful completion of ENGL 1301 or equivalent. This class is reading and writing intensive.

Course covers representative American writers and their writings to the present. Studies are both narrative and expository prose, along with drama and poetry.

Oral and written composition principles. Emphasis on language study and mechanics of writing, with the short composition and writing of investigative papers stressed. (Rd, Wtg)

A continuation of ENGL 1301. Analysis of prose narrative, poetry, drama, and film. Practice in expository and critical writing, and research methods. Prerequisite: successful completion of ENGL 1031 or equivalent or permission of department head. (Rdg. Wtg.)

A survey of the development of British literature from the Anglo-Saxon period to the Eighteenth century. Students will study works of prose, poetry, drama, and fiction in relation to their historical, linguistic, and cultural contexts. Texts will be selected from a diverse group of authors and traditions.

ENGL 1301 is designed to provide instruction in both writing and critical thinking skills. The course outcome projects an improved understanding of grammar and punctuation, sentence structure, paragraph organization, and essay organization. Critical thinking is encouraged throughout as students paraphrase, summarize, analyze, and synthesize information.

ENGL 2311 emphasizes principles, techniques, and skills needed for college level scientific, technical, or business writing. Students are introduced to the major document categories (letters, e-mails, memos, instructions, proposals, and reports) they will be expected to write in the workplace. Prerequisite: successful completion of ENGL 1301 or equivalent. This class is reading and writing intensive.

ENGL 1301 is designed to provide instruction in both writing and critical thinking skills. The course outcome projects an improved understanding of grammar and punctuation, sentence structure, paragraph organization, and essay organization. Critical thinking is encouraged throughout as students paraphrase, summarize, analyze, and synthesize information.

A general survey of the major works in American literature from pre-1700 to the 20th century.

The WTC English Lab is the resource home for all grammar and punctuation exercises used in conjunction with ENGL 1301 (Composition I) and ENGL 1302 (Composition II). This includes WYSIWYGs using audio instruction and fillable form PDFs, Prescription assignments using fillable form PDFs, and e-learning Prescriptions using SCORM-based online assessments.

ENGL 2341. Forms of Literature.
Survey of Dramatic Literature.
This class surveys the development of western civilization's dramatic literature from the ancient Greeks to contemporary American theatre. Students will analyze dramatic works in relation to their historical, linguistic, and cultural contexts.

Introductory course for developing understanding in art primarily through lectures, readings, films, and demonstrations. Attempts to develop ways of approaching art works, bases for analyses and criticisms, and functions of art in the environment.

Welcome to Art Appreciation! This class will introduce you to a variety of two and three-dimensional art techniques, to a plethora of artists, and to many ideas about the motivations and social implications of art. Art is HUGE and fun to explore; here you'll read about it, write about it, and even create a few pieces in order to discover just how important Art really is.

Introduction to the basics of pixel-based photography. Includes camera operation, techniques, knowledge of chemistry, and presentation skills. Emphasis on design, history, and contemporary trends as a means of developing an understanding of photographic aesthetics.


Ray Newton's Dram 1310 Theatre Appreciation studies the development of western theatre. This class is an overview of Western Civilization's theatre practices from the Ancient Greeks to contemporary American theatre. We read, watch, and interact with representative plays and theatre practices.[NO ACTING - This is a lecture class.]

A study of the cinematic art form. Emphasis on the analysis of the visual and aural aspects of selected motion pictures, dramatic aspects of narrative films, and historical growth and sociological effect of film as an art.

A general survey of music literature designed for the non-music major. Information and techniques for the intelligent appreciation of music through readings and recorded music. Includes the study of cultural periods, major composers, and musical elements.

A general survey of music literature designed for the non-music major. Information and techniques for the intelligent appreciation of music through readings and recorded music. Includes the study of cultural periods, major composers, and musical elements.

Application of communication theory and practice to the public speaking context, with emphasis on audience analysis, speaker delivery, ethics of communication, cultural diversity, and speech organizational techniques to develop students’ speaking abilities, as well as ability to effectively evaluate oral presentations.

Application of communication theory and practice to the public speaking context, with emphasis on audience analysis, speaker delivery, ethics of communication, cultural diversity, and speech organizational techniques to develop students’ speaking abilities, as well as ability to effectively evaluate oral presentations.

 Study and application of communication within the business and professional context. Special emphasis will be given to communication competencies in presentations, dyads, teams and technologically mediated formats.

Application of communication theory and practice to the public speaking context, with emphasis on audience analysis, speaker delivery, ethics of communication, cultural diversity, and speech organizational techniques to develop students’ speaking abilities, as well as ability to effectively evaluate oral presentations.

Application of communication theory and practice to the public speaking context, with emphasis on audience analysis, speaker delivery, ethics of communication, cultural diversity, and speech organizational techniques to develop students’ speaking abilities, as well as ability to effectively evaluate oral presentations.

Origin and development of the U.S. Constitution, structure and powers of the national government including the legislative, executive, and judicial branches, federalism, political participation, the national election process, public policy, civil liberties and civil rights.

Origin and development of the Texas constitution, structure and powers of state and local government, federalism and inter-governmental relations, political participation, the election process, public policy, and the political culture of Texas.

Origin and development of the U.S. Constitution, structure and powers of the national government including the legislative, executive, and judicial branches, federalism, political participation, the national election process, public policy, civil liberties and civil rights. Note: GOVT 2305 will complete one-half of the legislative requirements in American government. Counterpart to GOVT 2306. May not substitute GOVT 2301.

Introductory course in the theory and practice of government and politics in America.

Origin and development of the U.S. Constitution, structure and powers of the national government including the legislative, executive, and judicial branches, federalism, political participation, the national election process, public policy, civil liberties, and civil rights.

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, and intellectual history of the United Stated from the Civil Ware/Reconstruction era to the present. United States History II examines industrialization, immigration, world wars, the Great Depression, Cold War and post-Cold War eras. Themes that may be addressed in United States History II include:  American culture, religion, civil and human rights, technological change, economic change, immigration and migration, urbanization and suburbanization, the expansion of the federal government, and the study of U.S. foreign policy.

Study of the American nation from English colonization to the close of Reconstruction. Development if American characteristics and nationality from the early European exploration to the end of Reconstruction in 1877. Required for all students for graduation. (Rd, Wtg)

Study of the American nation from English colonization to the close of Reconstruction. Development if American characteristics and nationality from the early European exploration to the end of Reconstruction in 1877. Required for all students for graduation. (Rd, Wtg)

Introductory course in the theory and practice of government and politics in America.

Study of the American nation from English colonization to the close of Reconstruction. Development of American characteristics and nationality from
the early European exploration to the end of Reconstruction in 1877.

Study of the American nation from English colonization to the close of Reconstruction. Development of American characteristics and nationality from the early European exploration to the end of Reconstruction in 1877. Required of all students for graduation (Rd.Wtg)

A survey of the social, political, economic, cultural, and intellectual history of the United States from the pre-Columbian era to the Civil War/Reconstruction period. United States History I include the study of pre-Columbian, colonial, revolutionary, early national, slavery and sectionalism, and the Civil War/Reconstruction eras. Themes that may be addressed in United States History I include: American settlement and diversity, American culture, religion, civil and human rights, technological change, economic change, immigration and migration, and creation of the federal government.

Topics may include introductory treatments of sets, logic, number systems, number theory, relations, functions, probability and statistics. Appropriate applications are included.

This course is designed for students requiring remediation in intermediate algebra skills. Topics for this course include exponents and polynomials; factoring; rational expressions and functions and roots and radicals.

This course is designed for students requiring remediation in intermediate algebra skills. Topics for this course include exponents and polynomials; factoring; rational expressions and functions and roots and radicals.

Topics may include, but are not limited to the real number system; linear equations and applications; linear inequalities and absolute value; graphs of linear equations and inequalities; functions; and system of linear equations.

Topics may include, but are not limited to the real number system; linear equations and applications; linear inequalities and absolute value; graphs of linear equations and inequalities; functions; and system of linear equations.

Topics may include, but are not limited to, the real number system; linear equations and applications; linear inequalities and absolute value; graphs of linear equations and inequalities; functions, and system of linear  equations.

Topics may include, but are not limited to, the real number system; linear equations and applications; linear inequalities and absolute value; graphs of linear equations and inequalities; functions, and system of linear  equations.


Topics may include, but are not limited to, the real number system; linear equations and applications; linear inequalities and absolute value; graphs of linear equations and inequalities; functions, and system of linear  equations.

Topics for this course will include: transcendental functions, applications of integration including area, volume and work, techniques of integrations, infinite series, and lab applications. Prerequisite: successful completion of MATH2413 (rd, Mth)

Techniques of analysis of numerical data, including measures of central tendency, dispersion, probability, statistical inference, sampling theory, linear correlation, regression, probability distribution, and tests of significance. Analysis of variance and use of statistical software will be emphasized. Prerequisite: successful completion of MATH 0302 or MATH 1332 or placement by college entrance exam scores.

An introduction to mathematics and the solving of word problems to include sets; the real number system; elementary algebra including equations and inequalities in one variable, radicals; systems of equations and inequalities with graphing; simple geometry and geometric formulae using U.S. customary and metric measurements.

Topics for this course include: elementary functions; mathematics of finance; systems of linear equations; matrices; linear inequalities; linear programming; logic; sets and counting; and probability.

Topics for this course will include: trigonometric functions; solutions of triangle; trigonometric identities and equations; and inverse trigonometric functions. Prerequisite: MATH 1314, or placement by college entrance exam score(s).

Topics for this course include: linear, quadratic, and absolute value equations; linear and absolute value inequalities; complex numbers; graphing equations; writing equations of the line; polynomial, rational, exponentials, and logarithmic functions; systems of equations; properties and inverses of matrices.

Topics for this course will include: linear, quadratic, and absolute value equations; linear and absolute value inequalities; complex numbers, graphing equations; polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; systems of equations. Prerequisite: successful completion of MATH 0303, or MATH 1332, or placement by college entrance exam score(s).

Topics for this course will include: limits and continuity, derivatives, applications of the derivative, differentials, indefinite integrals, definite integrals. Prerequisite: successful completion of MATH 1316 or MATH 1348 or placement by college entrance exam score(s). (Rd, Mth)

This is a Calculus course which introduces limits, derivatives and basic integration.

This is a Calculus course which introduces limits, derivatives and basic integration.

This course is Business Calculus which applies limits, derivatives and basic integration to the Business World.


Elementary Statistics lab. Only Math 1442 students need to complete the lab.

Elementary Statistics - techniques of analysis of numerical data are emphasized.

This course was designed to help high school students become college ready in Mathematics.

This course was designed to help high school students become college ready in Mathematics.

This course was designed to help high school students become college ready in Mathematics.

American Minorities focuses on dominate-subordinate relations in world
society, with a major focus on the United States. The course explores
models of assimilation, it investigates colonial and class society,
and it examines the consequences for minority and majority populations

General Psychology is a survey of the major psychological topics, theories, and approaches to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes.

This classes only includes the MWF and ITV students.

General Psychology is a survey of the major psychological topics, theories, and approaches to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes.

This classes only includes the Tuesday - Thursday students.

General Psychology is a survey of the major psychological topics, theories, and approaches to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes.

This classes only includes the MWF and ITV students.

Life-Span Growth and Development is a study of social, emotional, cognitive, and physical factors and influences of a developing human from conception to death.  Campus Students Only.

General Psychology is a survey of the major psychological topics, theories, and approaches to the scientific study of behavior and mental processes.

This classes only includes the MWF and ITV students.

Life-Span Growth and Development is a study of social, emotional, cognitive, and physical factors and influences of a developing human from conception to death.  Campus Students Only.

The scientific study of human society, including ways in which groups, social institutions, and individuals affect each other. Causes of social stability and social change are explored through the application of various theoretical perspectives, key concepts, and related methods of sociology. Analysis of social issues in their institutional context may include topics such as social stratification, gender, race-ethnicity, and deviance.

The scientific study of human society, including ways in which groups, social institutions, and individuals affect each other. Causes of social stability and social change are explored through the application of various theoretical perspectives, key concepts, and related research methods of sociology. Analysis of social issues in their institutional context may include topics such as social stratification, gender, race-ethnicity, and deviance.

This course explores select groups of current social problems with specific reference to their origin, development, and suggested solutions. This course further applies the principles of group behavior and organization to the analysis of problems in basic social institutions and consideration of possible solutions.

Study of the use and abuse of drugs in today's society. Emphasized the physiological, sociological, and psychological factors.

This course is for Roscoe/WTC students only.

Additional study of the physiology and biochemistry of the human and other vertebrates with special emphasis on homeostasis and disease. Includes a required lab.

Study of the structure and function of human anatomy, including the neuroendocrine, integumentary, musculoskeletal, digestive, urinary, reproductive, respiratory, and circulatory systems. Content may be either integrated or specialized.

Fundamental principles of living organisms including physical and chemical properties of life, organization, function, evolutionary adaptation, and classification. Concepts of reproduction, genetics, ecology, and the scientific method are included.

Study of the structure and function of humananatomy, including the neuroendocrine,integumentary, musculoskeletal, digestive,urinary, reproductive, respiratory, andcirculatory systems. Content may be eitherintegrated or specialized.

Fundamental course designed as an introduction to concepts of essential nutrition with emphasis on individual nutrition related to health issues.

MICROBIOLOGY FOR NON-SCIENCE MAJORS

Morphology, physiology, and taxonomy of representative groups of microorganisms with emphasis on pathogenesis, disinfection, and sanitation.

Study of the structure and function of humananatomy, including the neuroendocrine,integumentary, musculoskeletal, digestive,urinary, reproductive, respiratory, andcirculatory systems. Content may be eitherintegrated or specialized.

Fundamental principles of living organisms including physical and chemical properties of life, organization, function, evolutionary adaptation, and classification. Concepts of reproduction, genetics, ecology, and the scientific method are included.

Fundamental principles of living organisms will be studied, including physical and chemical properties of life, organization, function, evolutionary adaptation, and classification. Concepts of cytology, reproduction, genetics, and scientific reasoning are included. Required laboratory activities will reinforce the lecture material.

Chemical equilibrium; phase diagrams and spectrometry; acid-base concepts, thermodynamics, kinetics, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry, an introduction to organic chemistry and descriptive inorganic chemistry. Required laboratory.

General principles, problems, fundamental laws, and theories.

A survey of the fundamental theories of chemistry and the properties of matter emphasized in inorganic chemistry. For pre-nursing and non-science majors. Lab work will include some qualitative analysis. Includes a required lab.

Introduces the basic physical processes of the earth including erosion and deposition from various factors. Emphasizes plate tectonics, earth materials, weathering and the development of landforms from various earth processes, ocean studies, meteorology and Earth's place in the solar system. The lab provides identification of rocks and minerals and an introduction to topographic and geologic map interpretation as well as activities in meteorology, climatology, oceanography and astronomy..

Continuation of PHYS1401. Study of fundamentals of electricity and magnetism, wave motion, sound and light. includes a required laboratory. Prerequisites: PHYS1401 (Rd, Mth)

Designed for engineering, physics and physical science, pre-medical and pre-dental students and students of architecture and education. Study of elements of mechanics, mechanics of fluids, properties of matter, and heat. Prerequisite: high school trigonometry and MATH1314 or concurrent enrollment therein. Includes a required laboratory.

Designed for pre-medical and pre-dental students and students of architecture and education. Study of elements of mechanics, mechanics of fluids, properties of matter, and heat. Prerequisite: high school trigonometry and MATH1314 or concurrent enrollment therein. Includes a required laboratory. (Rdg, Mth)

Designed for pre-medical and pre-dental students and students of architecture and education. Study of elements of mechanics, mechanics of fluids, properties of matter, and heat. Prerequisite: high school trigonometry and MATH1314 or concurrent enrollment therein. Includes a required laboratory. (Rdg, Mth)